A Quick Start Guide to B2B Content Marketing

You have the B2B content marketing framework. You know your goals. What next?

Liquid Marketer is relentless with eliminating content marketing spend that has no RoI. This year was no different – some marketing spend was already on the table due to Covid.

We recently worked with a (B2B) client to craft a content marketing plan. Liquid Marketer’s content marketing plans are, more than anything else, doable and measurable. Everything else is secondary.

I decided to pen this thought-storm down when it is still fresh in memory. We evaluated many different things and we believe it might help a few B2B marketers as they work on their own content marketing plans. Look at this as a loose collection of content marketing ideas; some of this is likely familiar for you, some might be worth thinking about, some outright irrelevant.

Use this as a quick-start B2B content marketing guide that can direct your own thinking.

Quick start guide to b2b content marketing
Quick start guide to b2b content marketing

Content communities

Are you paying to get your content published elsewhere? Do you spend marketing dollars to expand the reach of your awareness content?

If so, you may want to think of your own content community. You may not want to create the next Quora but be warned that this is a heavy lift.

Content communities are groups of people who come together because they have a specific problem or expect a specific type of information. The bottom line is, they’re driven by common interests. You must already know who they are.

If a community already exists (say on Reddit or Quora), join them. Contribute. Empathize.

Often, there might be relevant LinkedIn groups. Before you choose to spend time on LinkedIn groups, take a look at their history. Is there productive community behavior or is it just people spamming with sales pitches and no engagement?

If you have a product that has a critical number of users, forums built around peer- and expert- problem solving. Ensure there is active involvement from your company to moderate discussions and solve user problems.

Sometimes, discussions on such forums can give you insights for new user friendly topics. This way, they’ll see you as one of their own, thereby winning their trust—a key attribute in content marketing success.

Less is more for webinars

Physical conferences have been pushed to the back burner, with video, podcast, and webinar content becoming prominent. Live video will become even more prevalent because it’s a quick and effective medium.

But, ask yourself, how many hours did you spend on attending webinars since Covid? How many were directly useful for you?

There is such a thing as Zoom fatigue.

As people become increasingly time poorer, they will also become choosier about how and where they spend time.

Have a clear calendar for virtual events and webinars. Painstakingly craft the content for the audience. Make sure there is tangible value for the viewer.

How do you know? Run your leaders through one. Can they sit through it?

If it is a recorded webinar, market it with previews and bite sized nuggets.

Importantly, use this across mediums. Extract audio and make it a podcast. Provide a written transcript for folks who don’t like video (yes, they exist).

Less is more. Have a bias towards doing one meaningful, well-planned webinar a quarter than one a month of hastily put together content.

Repurpose content and don’t forget SEO

SEO has always been pivotal for content marketing. There is outsized benefit to those who adopt SEO best practices. Things like relevant long tail keywords and where you place them in your content will be critical to better ranking on search engines.

If your company is on the first page of Google, you are capturing anywhere from 71-92% of all sales related to the search.

Make it a point to explore Google Snippets this year. f your business shows up as a Google Snippet, it will likely receive double the amount of clicks.

Google Snippets provide a direct answer to search queries with a link to the website from where it was found. To be seen, you must understand the questions your customers are asking, create content that specifically answers them, and write in-depth copy that keeps them reading and visiting.

Content RoI

If you have a theme for your webinar and video content, develop a section on your website exclusively for them.

Tip: You must know where this content fits in the B2B marketing framework. If not, you run the risk of regressing to packaging sales pitches as webinars and videos.

Repurpose the videos across channels and in different formats. This means tweaking and refreshing existing content, and sharing it extensively in different formats—video, podcasts, text, infographics, etc.

Such silo pages pay for themselves over a very short period of time. Have a separate SEO strategy for the section. Google also prioritizes long-form, in-depth content in its page ranking criteria. As such, edited transcripts of webinar discussions give you an easy way to churn out relevant content.

The silo can also be a great way to begin building a content community.

How do you measure the RoI for this? How much do you invest?

A simple back-of-the-envelope calculation can help you decide. How much do you pay to sponsor and speak at an event? How many visits and leads do you get from it?

Can you develop a theme, create compelling content for it, get buy-in from your leaders and customers, deploy it and keep it ticking with new content for the next two years without additional $?

If you can do this for less than the cost of a single event that you typically sponsor, go ahead and do it. If everything goes well, you can save the cost of a channel in less than two years, while giving yourself a valuable brand asset that you can run on your terms.

Is any of this on your radar for this year? Let us know in the comments. If you have a question or have suggestions, leave it as a comment or get in touch with us.

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